Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Under the wire by a nose?

Before becoming a teacher, I was a sportswriter. I still enjoy the dramatic story lines and athletic feats inherent in sports, not to mention the abundantly available metaphors. So, count this entry as my checked-swing effort to dribble a hit past tonight's Slice of Life deadline. A bloop to keep my weekly blogging streak alive.

An hour ago, I found myself near the end of middle-school Back to School Night. Two parents dropped in to ask a question about Ultimate Frisbee on behalf of their son in high school. (The son, I'd taught back in sixth grade; Ultimate Frisbee is a volunteer coaching gig for me these days.) After getting their question answered, the parents also gifted me with the news that their younger son, still in middle school, fondly remembered my attendance at a play in which he acted last year and a compliment I'd shared with him about his scene-stealing performance. (He and I have not yet shared a classroom.)

At the end of a long day, the exchange left me wrapped in the comfortable blanket of historian Henry Adams' now borderline cliche: "A teacher...can never tell where his influence stops." Sometimes, though, we get clues.

13 comments:

  1. The best way ever to end a back-to-school night! I love the image of this exchange leaving you wrapped in a comfortable blanket.

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  2. Love that you kept your commitment to weekly writing! Old habits can come in handy.

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  3. I would say those moments were more than clues! It si clear that you have impacted both of these young men. Glad you ended Back to School Night on such a positive note. Your former career explains your vivid writing.

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  4. What a great end to your evening. And you are so right about influence.

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  5. HI Brian #sunchatblogger Gillian here!
    I kept going back to your first para--the engaging story-lines and abundant metaphors. THAT's exactly how we need to see our lessons and units! Thanks for sharing. And, yes, the influence goes wayyyyy out.
    www.educationthatinspires.ca

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    1. Right on, Gillian. I like that lens you're looking through re: the creativity of language and experiences as batteries for learning. Worthy imagining to be done in service of instruction, as you champion.

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  6. Coaching, teaching, parenting, a student learning, the giving/receiving of compliments... it's all good! Sporting of each and everyone to keep being in the game of life. Too bad so many require 'keeping score' [reference to the grading dilemma]. And your writing style makes it all the more enjoyable to read... not to mention having discussions with others here via your catalytic influence. Thanks, sport; very much appreciated in short or long run. !dnuora lla sguH

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    1. Hmm. Anonyomous sounds suspiciously like the tree from which this apple fell.

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    2. ?notweN caasI
      Be coreful, sauce you don't land on that knee. Might be a rotten way to appeal for a releafer. I'm branching out & not barking up the wrong tree? Signed, A. Non Ymous

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  7. Soooo true! It is often the smallest of things they remember too! It is always such a gift to hear. Go you!

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  8. Yay! And how did I not know you were a writer? Of course you were. Love this Slice!

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  9. What a great way to end a long day. All of those little things - they matter!

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